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are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
are tracking severe weather that is making its way across the southeastern u.s. it's already killed one person and injured a dozen in louisiana. >>> a peaceful protest in the ivory coast. one moment a blood bath. just seconds later and you'll see the entire scene as it played out. women gunned down in the streets. the shooters, the government security forces. >>> a new development in the ongoing drama that is charlie sheen. he is taking your questions live. we'll tell you about that. >>> plus the ipad getting competition from blackberry. we're taking apart the playbook and looking at the ipad 2 headed to stores less than a year after its predecessor. i'm don lemon at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta. a lot of news to get to right now. we start in north africa. u.s. military planes are now assisting people who have been stuck in tunisia after fleeing neighboring libya because of ongoing violence. more than 130 egyptian refugees today lifted to cairo aboard two planes. inside libya forces say they repelled pro gadhafi trims attempted to take the city of zawia near tripoli. a look how the u.
reports about how the pilots were recovered. there's one report that a u.s. helicopter with special forces, or search-and-rescue teams, either one of the two, rescued one, and then there's a report out there the other pilot was picked up by a rebel group, which is interesting and unusual, of course, but that's all we know about the fate of the pilots. they're safe and the pentagon continues to insist this plane was not shot down, that it was a mechanical problem. >> ron allen, reporting from cairo for us, thank you very much. >>> let's talk about what's happening on the ground. for that i want to bring in former general monty miggs. always good to see you. richard engel says these guys, the anti-gadhafi forces can't even load their own weapons, they don't know who their leaders are. it seems like their strategy is to rely on us. how do you see it? >> certainly they have asked for us to come in and keep the libyan air force off of them, but remember, some of the forces in afghanistan look pretty shaky, and over a period of time they have made themselves pretty effective, so don't completely
establish the no-fly zone and suppress his air defences. >> reporter: the secretaries also made clear u.s. policy that moammar qaddafi must go is not the aim of the current mission. >> one of the things that i think is central is you don't, in a military campaign, set as a mission or a goal something you're not sure you can achieve. >> reporter: the critics on capitol hill say the administration's policy lacks clarity. >> i think there should have been a plan for what our objectives were, a debate as to why this was in our vital interest before we committed military forces to libya rd today nato assumed full command of the mission. the president says america's role will be limited. >> we're not putting any ground forces into libya. >> reporter: and that other union heaveal in the middle east like the recent bloody crack down in syria will be looked at case by case. >> each of these, we are looking at and an liz will-- analyzing carefully. but we can't draw some general, sweeping conclusions about the entire region. >> reporter: and president obama makes his pitch monday evening in a telev
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
. still, u.s. warships and planes helping with relief efforts temporarily moved away from the area as a precaution. crews have been desperately trying to avoid a nuclear meltdown at the facility since it was damaged in friday's powerful earthquake. over the weekend they dumped sea water into the reactors to try to cool them down. more than 180,000 residents were also evacuated, and had to be scanned for radiation before entering shelters. across the northeast coast, more than 10,000 people are believed to be dead from the magnitude 9 quake, and tsunami. dramatic new video captured violent waves that slammed ashore, wiping out entire villages. since the massive earthquake three days ago, aftershocks continue to rattle the region. an average of 12 to 15 per hour. some more than 6.0 in magnitude. but there are stories of survival. crews rescued this 60-year-old man who was clinging to what was left of his roof. this man also made it out alive. i thought i was dying when i was pushed into the water, he says. but with thoughts of my family i decided to make every effort to survive. but
the president's plan. >>> fallout fears. the pentagon considers the mandatory evacuation of all u.s. military personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regi
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hope to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors, and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel pumps are basically sound, and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke bi
to the west. >>> training accident. a jet engine explodes and catches fire aboard a u.s. aircraft carrier. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. can you? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us today, i'm betty nguyen. we begin in libya, where cia operatives have been on the ground gathering intelligence, and making contact with rebel forces. the rebel troops are being pushed back by libyan forces, losing about 100 miles in two days. meanwhile, a key adviser to moammar gadhafi has resigned amid some international intrigue. joel brown is in washington. good morning, joel. bring us up to speed. >> a lot going on, betty. good morning to you. we're learning now the cia's been on the ground in libya for weeks now, in some cases working hand in hand with the rebels. but whether or not to supply weapons to the opposition is a whole other matter that sparks fierce debate here in washington. cia operatives are reportedly on the ground in libya. the intelligence agency sent in small teams earlier this
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
are struggling to contain the threat of multiple meltdowns. flooding across large parts of the u.s. force some residents out of their homes and on to higher ground. and pushed out. the state department spokesman quits after causing the treatment of the suspected wikileaks leaker ridiculous. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. we are getting a clearer picture of the death and devastation in japan caused by friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. here's the latest. japan has now upgraded the quake to a magnitude 9. more than 1400 people are confirmed dead, with fears the toll could surge past 10,000. authorities say there is a risk of another nuclear reactor explosion, but u.s. officials say there is no radiation threat to the west coast. dent all along the we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracey in tokyo. >> reporter: the port town of minamisanriku on the northeastern coast is nearly wiped out and in the area near there authorities now fear 10,000 people may be dead. when
but not u.s. a top qaddafi insider who defected and his connection to pan am flight 103. i'm erica hill. also tonight, milk in the u.s. now showing traces of radiation from japan. what authorities are doing to keep you safe. why did plants that bury nuclear waste inside nevada's yucca mountain get killed? was it safety fears or politics? and the sweet taste of success. they owe their lottery jackpot to a candy bar. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. muammar qaddafi's inner circle continues to shrink. first, his foreign minister defected last night. and then today, his u.n. ambassador quit while in egypt. just the same, qaddafi's military, though decimated by allied air strikes, is still pounding rebel forces. driving them further east away from key oil towns. one rebel leader compared qaddafi to a wounded animal, one that's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin b
's very important to understand what general madis said today. what he said, that is if the u.s. decided to enforce a no-fly zone it would, first, involve u.s. military air strikes against targets inside libya. you'd have to bomb the runways. you might take out their aircraft or certainly their air defense systems, missiles, radar, and the like. so it would involve a u.s. military attack on libya itself. and if the white house makes that decision, of course, the u.s. military would carry it out. but i can tell you that there's a lot of hesitation, not only here in the building and among the u.s. military to take that kind of aggressive step, but even among the nato allies who would be essential if the u.s. and nato allies were to launch any kind of operation like this, and so far only the british are doing any kind of saber rattling in that regard. and the rest of nato nations, allies, are pretty much silent whether to launch any military operation against libya. >> give is insight on the three military war ships in the suez canal. what is their role, at this point? >> reporter: their ro
>>> u.s. soldiers slain. a gunman opens fire on a u.s. military bus. a man in custod neberlin -- custody in berlin. and the reason for the attacks. >> hi. i'm kai jackson. and i'm mary bubala. here's what people are talking about. >>> a gunman opens fire. two u.s. airmen are killed and two others hurt. randall pinkston has more on wjz. >> reporter: the shooter opened fire at the bus carrying u.s. air force personnel, set outside a terminal in frankfurt, germany. two other u.s. airmen were seriously wounded. president obama is promising to get to the bottom of the attack. >> we will spare no effort in learning how this outrageous act took place. and working with german authorities to ensure that all of the pern traitors are brought to justice. >> reporter: after firing his weapon, the gunman ran into a terminal, where authorities tackled him. he is now in police custody. investigators are looking into whether the shooting had any ties to terror groups. the airport is near ramstein air force base, the headquarters of the u.s. air force in europe. the victims were part of an air
>>> show of force. more u.s. warships head to the mediterranean, as libyan rebels consider asking for international military intervention. >>> open for business. the house passes a stopgap budget bill. the senate is expected to follow suit today. >>> and teacher tenure. the next union battle in america >>> and teacher tenure. the next union battle in america begins to take shape. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, there are reports that libyan government forces have launched air attacks against rebel-held positions in eastern libya. meanwhile, two u.s. navy ships enter the suez canal en route to the mediterranean, and it is also reported rebel leaders are considering whether to ask for outside military help. susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. while the opposition leaders in libya are considering asking for western air strikes u.s. defense leaders remain very cautious. they are weighing their options, and the consequences, of u.s. military a
much time. u.s. and allied warships are stationed off the coast of libya ready to launch cruise missile that would take out qaddafi's command centers and air defense network. after that, aircraft-- mostly british and french operating from bases in the mediterranean-- would enforce a no-fly zone and threaten his ground forces with air strikes if they attack the rebels. the president promised no american troops would gol into libya while one way or another, said secretary of state clinton, qaddafi has to go. >> we do believe that a final result of any negotiations would have to be the decision by colonel qaddafi to leave. >> reporter: secretary clinton will be in paris tomorrow for one last round of talks with allies. but unless qaddafi orders first a cease-fire and then a retreat, the time for talking seems to be up. tonight there is no sign qaddafi's forces are observing a cease-fire much less pulling back. in fact, one u.s. official says they are still advancing on benghazi. harry? >> smith: david, what happens if these qaddafi forces keep moving toward benghazi? >> reporter: benghazi
billion of dollars. >>> the u.s. supreme court is expected to rule by summer. >>> an intense search is underway after a shooting in a parking lot of a mall. we're over the marley station's mall parking lot. a man was shot here. he made his way near the highway. he was rushed to shock trauma and police are looking for two suspects in a dark gray hon dam - - honda. >>> today, the man accused in the murder of an eastern shore girl pleads guilty. vic has more. >> reporter: the prosecutors agreed to take the death penalty off the table for legs. this is for the murder of an 11- year-old. the girl was kidnapped and found dead on christmas day in 2009. her mother spoke today. >> we thank you for giving up your christmas of '09 to bring our baby home. >> we want to thank everyone. >> we now have closure and we can move on. including the community. >> he dated her aunt for some time. >>> wjz sat down with scary's parents. -- with sara's parents. >>> a baltimore county police officer is officially charged. coal westton has been in charge of the police union since the 90s. late last week, he w
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
. officials have been scrambling to avoid a meltdown ever since and are now asking the u.s. for help. >> in particular they have asked for additional types of equipment that will help provide water and other types of resources to ensure that the reactors continue to be cooled. >> reporter: fears of a full blown meltdown have spread all the way to tokyo located 150 miles from the plant. officials there have detected low levels of radiation and a shift in winds threatens to push it even further. even without a possible nuclear disaster, japan is facing its worst crisis since world war ii. death toll jumped to more than 2400 confirmed dead, but officials warn that number is likely to top 10,000. and now the country faces an economic crisis, as well. this morning japanese stocks plummeted more than 10%. as far as that radiation cloud, as i said, they have picked up low levels of radiation outside of tokyo, but there is another concern whether it intensifies and the wind shifts, it could head toward that area that was hardest hit by the earthquake and tsunami that followed. >> as we hear
's stricken nuclear power plant, the u.s. is arranging charter flights for americans who want to leave japan. i'm charlie d'agata in yoshita, japan, with the story coming up. >> the desperate search for loved ones during japan's worst crisis since world war ii. good morning, it is thursday, march 17, 2011, st. patrick's day. i'm sydnie kohara. >> hi, everybody. i'm frank mallicoat. it's 4:30. a good day to be hoop fans. we have a lot of basketball here on cbs. >> weather-wise, we have a lot of rain don't we, lawrence. >> all this rain is going to make everything nice and green around the bay area. yeah, happy st. patrick's day, folks. if you are heading out, things are going to be mostly dry today. but we do have a chance of a few showers north of the golden gate bridge. behind that, though, we have a significant storm system. that one is on the way. looks like friday could be a very wet and wild day around the bay area. we'll have more on that coming up. right now, let's get a check of traffic with elizabeth. >> dry for now. it's made for a very calm quiet start to our morning commute. in f
no action on the nation's gridirons this fall. and quake questions-- this town prepared in the u.s. for an earthquake as strong as the one that hit japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. it is already sunday morning in japan, and another major aftershock has just hit the country which is still digging out after friday's disastrous 8.9-magnitude earthquake. here's the latest-- an explosion at a nuclear power plant forced 170,000 people to evacuate while an emergency was declared tonight at a second reactor in the same complex. roads and buildings throughout the area have been devastated, and hundreds of thousands are stranded without food or water. we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracy in tokyo. >> reporter: with more cameras on the ground, we are now getting our closest look yet at the extent of the damage. it is simply overwhelming. in hard-hit sendai, a city of one million people, police say they found as many as 300 bodies washed up on the beach as the
@captioncolorado.com >>> good morning. breaking news. a u.s. war plane crashes in libya but the americans are board are said to be safe after a third night of attacks on tripoli and growing diplomatic battles who should take the lead in this mission. we will get the latest from libya and talk with senator john mccain about what is next for the u.s. and its allies. >>> fallout fears. japanese officials say the struggle to control leaking radiation at a crippled nuclear plant could go on for weeks as water in one of the storage pools becomes dangerously hot. concerns continue to grow over radiation leaking into the food and water supply while the death toll continues to skyrocket, "early" this tuesday morning, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "the early show" here on a tuesday morning. chris wragge along with erica hill. you're seeing pictures of an f-15 eagle strike down over libya late last night. >> breaking news we are following this morning. we want to get you the very late evidentest on that american fighter jet. you can see it crashed and what happened to the two on bors, david
,, >>> breaking news. a u.s. warplane crashes in libya, but the americans on board are said to be safe, this after a third night of attacks on tripoli in growing diplomatic battles on who should take the lead. we'll talk with senator john mccain about what's next for the u.s. and its allies. >>> and fallout fears. japanese officials say the struggle to control leaking radiation at a crippled nuclear plant could go on for weeks as water in a store annual pool becomes dangerously hot. concerns grow while the death toll continues to sky rocket early this tuesday morning march toll continues to sky rocket early this tuesday morning march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "the early show." chris wragge along with erica hill. you're seeing pictures of an f-15-e strike eagle down over libya late last night. >> and that is the breaking news we're following this morning. we want to get you the latest on that american fighter jet. it did crash. what happened to the two on board? david martin joins us from the pentagon with the latest. >> reporter: the headline is tha
details coming up. >>> the u.s. opens fire on libya. what prompted the president's decision and how gadhafi is reacting. >> and swept away by the tsunami. what became of the driver. >> good evening, a stormy day and we're not in the clear yet. another wave of heavy rain and strong winds is moving in at this hour. meteorologist, lawrence has more on that in a minute, but our team coverage begins with don knapp in san francisco and the mess left behind by the storm so far. don. >> and this wet and wild weekend is about to get a little wilder with the wind warnings coming up. there are wind advisories all the way down to the 50-mile an hour winds on the golden gate tonight and on the san mateo bridge. the big rigs and box trucks are restricted. that wind has already done damage on land. >> crews work to cut up and remove a 90-foot oak that crashed on to a house on walnut creek this evening. dropping the tree on to the roof, knocking out skylights and poking holes. no one was hurt. earlier today, wind and rain shut down highway 84 between skyline boulevard. falling trees brought dow
ports, ras lanuf and brega. nato is assuming command of all aerial operations in libya from the u.s. and tonight president obama will address the nation to discuss the u.s. mission in libya. joel brown is in washington with more. joel, good morning to you. >> terrell, good morning to you. white house officials say the president's speech will build on the case that he's been laying out for the last ten days or so. he'll argue that libya does matter when it comes to u.s. interests and that the administration's actions helped avert a catastrophe. tonight, president obama will try to convince a skeptical public and congress america's mission in libya is working. he'll deliver a nationally televised speech just a day after nato agreed to take full command of the operation. and at least one u.s. warship reportedly left the region. >> i think the military mission has gone quite well. >> reporter: the obama administration touted progress. following another weekend of air strikes. coalition forces hit targets in tripoli, and for the first time, moammar gadhafi's hometown of sirte. since the
a fierce debate-- should the u.s. arm the opposition? i'm erica hill. also tonight, kicking the habit. the president wants to cut oil imports by a third, and some drivers have already gotten the message. hyperactive kids-- why some experts believe artificial food coloring could make the behavior worse. >> mr. president! >> and a bullet meant for president reagan nearly took this man's life. 30 years later james brady is still fighting for gun control. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. just two days ago, libyan rebels seemed ready to move on muammar qaddafi's home town and possibly on tripoli, but tonight, they are on the move in the other direction. their weapons, machine guns for the most part are, no march for qaddafi's heavier weaponry. secretary of state hillary clinton said today no decision has been made about whether to arm the rebels, but there are also reports president obama recently signed a secret order authorizing covert support for them.
. >> the u.s. fighter jet goes down. but both airmen escape with minor injuries. joel brown reports for wjz, the u.s. is anxious to hand over control of the coalition attack. >> reporter: all that's left in libya is this burned-out shell. witnesses say the two pilots who ejected were here to control rebels. the pentagon blames equipment failure for the crash. the two pilots aren't badly hurt and are back in u.s. hands. it's the first loss but u.s. officials are calling it a success. >> virtually all are targeted. >> reporter: they launched another 24 missiles at moammar gadhafi's command center today. they extended the no-fly zone over eastern libya. the u.s. is eager to hand over control of the operation. >> a transfer within a few days is likely. >> reporter: it's still not clear just who the u.s. will turn over control to. either britain, france, or nato forces. still, many could say the job is far from done. >> reporter: the loosely controlled group is struggling to hold its ground. -- rebels say more and more civilians are dying inside the city, at the hands of gadhafi's men. >> report
'll see you in 30 minutes, cbs evening news is next. >> couric: tonight president obama warns the u.s. and nato are considering a military response to the crisis in libya as qaddafi's forces step up attacks on rebel-held oil towns. i'm katie couric. the violence is driving up the price you pay at the pump. but where's the money going? maybe not where you think, and should the u.s. tap the strategic reserves to bring prices down? they're here, the new 3-d mammograms. but should women be rushing to get one? and she's worn his m.i.a. bracelet for nearly 40 years waiting for the day she could remove it. that day has come. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. libyan government forces were back on the offensive today trying to retake more territory still held by the rebels. some of the heaviest fighting was in towns near tripoli and the u.n. says more than a million libyans now need humanitarian aid. president obama warned moammar qaddafi and his supporters they will be
>>> rebel retreat. libyan troops have opposition forces on the run. but for how long? as the u.s. considers arming the insurgency. >>> cajun cleanup. a powerful storm rolls through louisiana, threatening the southeast with flooding and high winds. >>> and union fight. ohio can vote on limiting collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to court. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the back and forth fighting in libya has turned against the rebel troops. opposition forces are on the run, fleeing the latest government counterattack. the rebels were trying to advance on moammar gadhafi's hometown of sirte. they've also had to leave two critical oil ports, brega and ras lanuf. the u.s. navy launched a new barrage of cruise missiles at targets near tripoli and nato takes command of the operation today. joel brown is in washington with more. good morning, joel. what's the latest? >> betty, it wasn't even a close fight. gadhafi forc
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
>>> making his case. president obama defends the u.s. mission in libya. >> some nations may be able to turn a blind eye to atrocities in other countries. the united states of america is different. >>> discrimination suit. america's biggest retailer on edge as the supreme court takes up one of the biggest workplace lawsuits in history. >>> and caught on tape. a vintage air force plane makes an unexpected water landing. about this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 29th, about this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. defending the u.s. military mission in libya. president obama says the operation was necessary to prevent a campaign of killing. this morning rebel forces continue to push west under the cover of allied air support. nato takes command of the operation tomorrow. secretary of state clinton arrived in london last night. this morning she attend a conference to discuss what comes next in libya. last night the president said u.s. actions in libya stopped a slaughte
over libya. the u.s. continues to move forces closer to libya. the president authorized u.s. military aircraft to help egyptians evacuate. but the administration is trying not to get sucked in to a mideast conflict. the president's hope is that gadhafi will head off a bloody stalemate and make way for new leadership. randall pinkston, cbs news, at the united nations. >>> the u.s. is asking iran for help returning ex-fbi agent robert levinson to his family. there's been no word on levinson since he vanished from the iranian island of kish four years ago while doing private detective work. iran has insisted they know nothing about his disappearance. levinson's family, though, has received proof that he is alive, and on thursday, secretary of state hillary rodham clinton said there are indications that he is in southwest asia. levinson's wife said, quote, our family is tremendously encouraged by the news that bob is alive, but remains concerned for his safety and well-being. >>> a u.s. aid contractor facing up to 20 years in prison goes on trial today in cuba. allen gross, seen here with
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
to libya. the u.s. and nato weighing a no fly zone. the global community is distancingself from the gadhafi regime. >> they love me. all my people with me. they love me all. >> but if they do love you -- >> they will die to protect me and my people. no, no, no. >> if you say they do love you, then why are they capturing bengazi and -- >> there is a guide, not my people. they come from outside. >> gadhafi spoke with abc news, the bbc and my next guest, a foreign affairs correspondent for the london times. thanks for being on the program. you interviewed gadhafi before, how did he seem to you now as compared to the past. >> this will seem strange, but he seemed more energized and relaxed. he laughed often during the program, when we asked him questions. he seemed to find some of the things we were saying amusing. >> i don't want to ask you to be an arm chair psychologist. maybe you can't answer this question. does he believe the stuff he's saying. does he appear to believe it's al qaeda? does he believe these people are on drugs that is being put in their milk? >> there were other things he s
residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moammar gadhafi. he's seen in the video there. many saying this really does pave the way for a military action. what could that mean? what could it look like? we'll get you the very latest on that coming up here. >> exactly. but first let's begin with the very latest on the disaster in japan. the danger level is being raised in
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